How to validate your start-up idea once and for all

Starting a new business is a scary process, but the rewards are there for all to see.

For some, it involves quitting their day job and making a giant leap into the unknown. Before they get to that phase, a degree of validation is required.

Every year, we hear about the frightening number of new companies that are unsuccessful in their first year of trading. By arming yourself with a robust validation process for your start-up idea, you can give yourself every possible chance of avoiding this trap.

Let’s now take a look at how to do this…

Define the problem that your start-up will solve

The first step is to get clear on the problem that your start-up will solve. This might seem obvious, but it’s important to get specific here.

For example, let’s say you’re looking to start a new business that helps busy professionals get in shape.

There are a few different problems that this could potentially solve. It could help them to:

  • Save time by providing a convenient workout solution
  • Save money by avoiding expensive gym memberships
  • Improve their health and fitness levels

All of these are valid problems that your start-up could potentially solve. However, it’s important to clarify which one (or ones) you’re specifically targeting. In other words, what is your unique selling point?

This will help you validate your start-up idea by ensuring a real demand for what you’re offering.

Research your target market

Once you’ve defined the problem your start-up will solve, it’s time to start researching your target market.

This involves finding out as much as you can about the most likely people to use your product or service.

This might include conducting surveys, interviews, and market research.

Your aim here is to understand your target market’s needs, wants, and pain points. This will help you validate your start-up idea by ensuring a real need for what you’re offering.

Identify your key competitors

Once you’ve done your research, it’s time to start looking at your key competitors.

This involves identifying the businesses that are already operating in your chosen market.

Your aim here is to understand what they’re offering and how your start-up can differentiate itself. This will help you validate your start-up idea by ensuring a real opportunity for your business to succeed.

What are your costs?

Next, let’s think about costs. This includes both the costs of setting up your business and running it on a day-to-day basis. Whether it is employee costs, the different types of insurance you’ll need, or even business rates – they all count.

Your aim here is to understand how much it will cost you to get your start-up off the ground and how much you’ll need to generate revenue to break even. This will help you validate your start-up idea by ensuring that it is realistically achievable.